Rebel Yell: The Violence, Passion, And Redemption Of Stonewall Jackson

Rebel Yell
by S. C. Gwynne

Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the epic New York Times bestselling account of how Civil War general Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson became a great and tragic national hero.

Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. As much as any person in the Confederate pantheon—even Robert E. Lee—he embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country’s greatest military figures. In April 1862, however, he was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. But by June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. Jackson’s strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged; he was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future.

In his “magnificent Rebel Yell…S.C. Gwynne brings Jackson ferociously to life” (New York Newsday) in a swiftly vivid narrative that is rich with battle lore, biographical detail, and intense conflict among historical figures. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson’s private life and traces Jackson’s brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.


Rebel Yell
by S. C. Gwynne

From the author of the prize-winning New York Times bestseller Empire of the Summer Moon comes a thrilling account of how Civil War general Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson became a great and tragic American hero.

Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. As much as any person in the Confederate pantheon, even Robert E. Lee, he embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country’s greatest military figures. His brilliance at the art of war tied Abraham Lincoln and the Union high command in knots and threatened the ultimate success of the Union armies. Jackson’s strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged; he was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future.

In April 1862 Jackson was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. By June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. He had, moreover, given the Confederate cause what it had recently lacked—hope—and struck fear into the hearts of the Union.

Rebel Yell is written with the swiftly vivid narrative that is Gwynne’s hallmark and is rich with battle lore, biographical detail, and intense conflict between historical figures. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson’s private life, including the loss of his young beloved first wife and his regimented personal habits. It traces Jackson’s brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.


Rebel Yell
by S. C. Gwynne

Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the epic New York Times bestselling account of how Civil War general Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson became a great and tragic national hero.

Stonewall Jackson has long been a figure of legend and romance. As much as any person in the Confederate pantheon—even Robert E. Lee—he embodies the romantic Southern notion of the virtuous lost cause. Jackson is also considered, without argument, one of our country’s greatest military figures. In April 1862, however, he was merely another Confederate general in an army fighting what seemed to be a losing cause. But by June he had engineered perhaps the greatest military campaign in American history and was one of the most famous men in the Western world. Jackson’s strategic innovations shattered the conventional wisdom of how war was waged; he was so far ahead of his time that his techniques would be studied generations into the future.

In his “magnificent Rebel Yell…S.C. Gwynne brings Jackson ferociously to life” (New York Newsday) in a swiftly vivid narrative that is rich with battle lore, biographical detail, and intense conflict among historical figures. Gwynne delves deep into Jackson’s private life and traces Jackson’s brilliant twenty-four-month career in the Civil War, the period that encompasses his rise from obscurity to fame and legend; his stunning effect on the course of the war itself; and his tragic death, which caused both North and South to grieve the loss of a remarkable American hero.


Stonewall Jackson’s Book of Maxims
by James I. Robertson

“Jackson’s maxims are reproduced here as he wrote them. Accompanying each are insights into the man. This information includes the origin of the adage, one or more quotations that parallel the maxim, how Jackson may have applied the idea in his own life, and how certain maxims offer insights into the mind of the man”–Jacket.

Inventing Stonewall Jackson
by Wallace Hettle

Historians’ attempts to understand legendary Confederate General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson have proved uneven at best and often contentious. An occasionally enigmatic and eccentric college professor before the Civil War, Jackson died midway through the conflict, leaving behind no memoirs and relatively few surviving letters or documents. In Inventing Stonewall Jackson, Wallace Hettle offers an innovative and distinctive approach to interpreting Stonewall by examining the lives and agendas of those authors who shape our current understanding of General Jackson.
Newspaper reporters, friends, relatives, and fellow soldiers first wrote about Jackson immediately following the Civil War. Most of them, according to Hettle, used portions of their own life stories to frame that of the mythic general. Hettle argues that the legend of Jackson’s rise from poverty to power was likely inspired by the rags-to-riches history of his first biographer, Robert Lewis Dabney. Dabney’s own successes and Presbyterian beliefs probably shaped his account of Jackson’s life as much as any factual research. Many other authors inserted personal values into their stories of Stonewall, perplexing generations of historians and writers.
Subsequent biographers contributed their own layers to Jackson’s myth and eventually a composite history of the general came to exist in the popular imagination. Later writers, such as the liberal suffragist Mary Johnston, who wrote a novel about Jackson, and the literary critic Allen Tate, who penned a laudatory biography, further shaped Stonewall’s myth. As recently as 2003, the film Gods and Generals, which featured Jackson as the key protagonist, affirmed the longevity and power of his image.
Impeccable research and nuanced analysis enable Hettle to use American culture and memory to reframe the Stonewall Jackson narrative and provide new ways to understand the long and contended legacy of one of the Civil War’s most popular Confederate heroes.


Stonewall
by Byron Farwell

The charismatic Confederate general Stonewall Jackson, who began his military career in the Mexican War, earned his great fame in the Civil War in a series of brilliantly fought battles. He was given the name Stonewall at the First Battle of Bull Run, when his brigade faced overwhelming odds but held the line. Byron Farwell’s engrossing narrative reveals Stonewall Jackson both as a military genius and as a quirky, dark personality radically different from the storybook version that grew up after Jackson’s untimely death at Chancellorsville in 1863.

Empire of the Summer Moon
by S. C. Gwynne

Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize
This stunning historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West was a major New York Times bestseller.

In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all.

S. C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches.

Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun.

The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being.

Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the “White Squaw” who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend.

S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.


Mighty Stonewall
by Frank E. Vandiver

Confederate General Thomas Jonathan Jackson was undoubtedly one of the most influential military commanders of the Civil War. Had he not met his death early in May, 1863, his influence could well have changed the course of the war. Frank E. Vandiver’s detailed research and zestful writing style provide a vivid description of Stonewall’s boyhood, West Point training, early career, years of teaching at the Virginia Military Institute, and Civil War campaigns. Here, too, are insights into Jackson’s personal life and his deep religious feelings, which were so influential on his military thought and actions. Frank E. Vandiver, president of Texas A&M University until September, 1988, directs the Mosher Institute of Defense Studies at Texas A&M University. He is also author of Black Jack: The Life and Times of John J. Pershing and Their Tattered Flags: The Epic of the Confederacy.

All Things for Good
by J. Steven Wilkins, George Grant

Thomas Jonathan Jackson, dubbed Stonewall”” following the battle of First Manassas in July 1861, was born in 1824 in Clarksburg, Virginia (now West Virginia). This extremely complex, often misunderstood man was orphaned at a young age, graduated from West Point in 1846, and participated in the Mexican War in 1848.

Attracted to the Virginia Military Institute in 1851, he resigned his commission in the army a year later. He left VMI in 1861 to join the Confederate army. Immediately commissioned a colonel, within months he had been promoted to the rank of brigadier general. He was mortally wounded by friendly fire at the May 1863 battle of Chancellorsville and died a week later.

Revered as a brilliant military leader, tactician, and one of the most adroit Confederate commanders, Jackson is a study in contrasts. He was justifiably feared by his enemies and totally beloved by his men. Yet his humble and sincere faith seemed at odds with his reputation as a ferocious warrior.

All Things for Good is a thoughtful new volume in the Leaders in Action Series. In it J. Steven Wilkins challenges some of the myths that surround Stonewall Jackson and celebrates his devout Christian faith.

“”


Standing Like a Stone Wall
by James I. Robertson

“YOU MAY BE WHAT EVER YOU WILL RESOLVE TO BE.” This was the credo that governed and defined the life of Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, perhaps the most extraordinary figure in American military history. From his childhood as an unloved, poorly educated orphan, it was Jackson’s pure determination that impelled him from his humble origins. A shy man, with some particularly odd habits, Jackson was an outcast by many standards. But it was his single-mindedness of purpose that landed him a position at West Point where he struggled but ultimately prevailed. It was his unflappable courage combined with an emerging and unshakeable faith in God that led him to distinguish himself in the Mexican-American War. Then, after serving as a professor at the Virginia Military Institute, Jackson rose to true glory during the Civil War where, during the first major battle, he received what is perhaps the most famous nickname in military history. Beloved by his men whom he drove to the limits of endurance, feared and yet admired greatly by his enemies whom he constantly surprised with his brilliant tactics, Jackson was a general who, in the heat of battle, was seemingly blind to his own personal danger. Victory after victory, he allowed himself no personal triumph but would often be seen astride his faithful horse, Sorrel, his hand thrust toward the sky, deep in prayer of thanks to the God who had allowed his cause to prevail. James I. Robertson Jr., history professor at Virginia Tech and the recognized authority on the life of “Stonewall” Jackson, offers young readers a gripping biography of an extraordinary man.

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